Water Quality Improvements

In keeping with our commitment to environmental leadership, and our continuing effort to improve water quality, OC Dana Point Harbor has made multiple improvements to the Harbor area.

In early 2008, OC Dana Point Harbor voluntarily participated in the Metropolitan Water Districts’ Public Sector Water Efficiency Program. The program involved a Harbor-wide audit of water usage, equipment, and procedures and resulted in numerous measures taken to conserve water and reduce runoff.

Several improvements were made to landscaping such as lowering soil levels in many planter areas and replacing spray irrigation systems with bubblers. Irrigation systems are frequently inspected and repaired, low maintenance yet visually appealing plants have been chosen for the common areas, and landscaping is now trimmed more frequently to minimize the amount of leaves falling into the water. All street and parking lot cleaning is performed on a regular basis using surface cleaners with built-in water recovery systems to eliminate runoff.

OC Dana Point Harbor has also taken multiple steps to guarantee that waste-removal procedures promote environmental protection and conservation. Daily trash collection is mandated throughout the facility and OC DPH worked with OC Parks to provide trash receptacles that prevent birds from scattering the contents. Additional cigarette urns are being installed along the public walkways to encourage proper disposal of cigarette butts, keeping the amount of potential debris entering Harbor waters to a minimum. Harbor Maintenance personnel make regular sweeps in a small boat along the basins, collecting trash and debris as needed.

Additional recycling receptacles such as monofilament line recycling collection stations have been established at several Harbor locations. OC Dana Point Harbor has also made provisions for the disposal of oil, oil filters, automatic transmission fluid, engine anti-freeze/coolant, batteries and bilge pads. Also available are hydrocarbon-absorbing bilge pads, to be placed in the bilges of boats to absorb oil, fuel, etc. as opposed to discharging these items overboard through bilge pumps.

In 2006 both the East and the West Marinas were designated Clean Marinas by the Clean Marinas California Program, and today continue to exceed the program’s requirements. The Harbor now strictly enforces the Environmental Protection Agency’s Best Management Practices and has also increased education and awareness efforts in order to encourage boaters to take an active role in safeguarding water quality.

Monofilament